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Timing of acute kidney injury--does it matter? A single-centre experience from the United Kingdom.

Pang, Ching Ling and Chanouzas, Dimitrios and Baharani, Jyoti (2014) Timing of acute kidney injury--does it matter? A single-centre experience from the United Kingdom. European journal of internal medicine, 25 (7). pp. 669-73. ISSN 1879-0828. This article is accessible to all HEFT staff and students via NICE journals and databases http://www.nice.org.uk/about/what-we-do/evidence-services/journals-and-databases by using their HEFT Athens login IDs

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Official URL: http://www.ejinme.com/article/S0953-6205(14)00175-...

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) is associated with high mortality and long-term dependence on RRT. However, there is limited information about the difference in outcome between patients who develop AKI in the community (c-AKI), and those who develop AKI in hospital (h-AKI).

AIM

Identify differences in short- and long-term outcomes between patients admitted with c-AKI and h-AKI who require intermittent haemodialysis, and to identify factors that predict poor outcome.

DESIGN & METHODS

Single-centre, retrospective analysis of 306 patients with AKI who received intermittent haemodialysis between 2009 and 2011.

FOLLOW-UP

six months. Primary endpoints: patient and renal survival. Secondary endpoints: time on dialysis, length of hospital stay, and admission to the intensive care unit (ICU).

RESULTS

Survival for patients in the h-AKI group was significantly lower, at 42.9% (compared to 72%). They had a significantly longer length of stay. However, at 6-month follow-up, the survival benefit of the c-AKI group was no longer significant. Patients with h-AKI were more likely to be dialysis independent at discharge and six months although this result did not reach statistical significance. Independent predictors of survival to discharge within the entire group included: renal/post-renal causes of AKI, younger age, pre-existing diabetes, and c-AKI. The only independent predictor for RRT dependence at discharge and six months was pre-existing chronic kidney disease.

CONCLUSIONS

h-AKI is associated with high mortality and longer hospital stays during the acute admission. However, h-AKI patients who survive are more likely to be independent of RRT at discharge and follow-up.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is accessible to all HEFT staff and students via NICE journals and databases http://www.nice.org.uk/about/what-we-do/evidence-services/journals-and-databases by using their HEFT Athens login IDs
Subjects: WJ Urogenital system. Urology
Divisions: Emergency Services > Renal
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Mrs Yolande Brookes
Date Deposited: 17 Apr 2015 11:53
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2015 11:53
URI: http://www.repository.heartofengland.nhs.uk/id/eprint/854

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