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The impact of chest compression rates on quality of chest compressions - a manikin study.

Field, Richard A and Soar, Jasmeet and Davies, Robin P and Akhtar, Naheed and Perkins, Gavin D (2012) The impact of chest compression rates on quality of chest compressions - a manikin study. Resuscitation, 83 (3). pp. 360-4. ISSN 1873-1570. This article is accessible to all HEFT staff and students via NHS Evidence www.evidence.nhs.uk by using their HEFT Athens login IDs

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Official URL: http://www.resuscitationjournal.com/article/S0300-...

Abstract

PURPOSE

Chest compressions are often performed at a variable rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The effect of compression rate on other chest compression quality variables (compression depth, duty-cycle, leaning, performance decay over time) is unknown. This randomised controlled cross-over manikin study examined the effect of different compression rates on the other chest compression quality variables.

METHODS

Twenty healthcare professionals performed 2 min of continuous compressions on an instrumented manikin at rates of 80, 100, 120, 140 and 160 min(-1) in a random order. An electronic metronome was used to guide compression rate. Compression data were analysed by repeated measures ANOVA and are presented as mean (SD). Non-parametric data was analysed by Friedman test.

RESULTS

At faster compression rates there were significant improvements in the number of compressions delivered (160(2) at 80 min(-1) vs. 312(13) compressions at 160 min(-1), P<0.001); and compression duty-cycle (43(6)% at 80 min(-1) vs. 50(7)% at 160 min(-1), P<0.001). This was at the cost of a significant reduction in compression depth (39.5(10)mm at 80 min(-1) vs. 34.5(11)mm at 160 min(-1), P<0.001); and earlier decay in compression quality (median decay point 120 s at 80 min(-1) vs. 40s at 160 min(-1), P<0.001). Additionally not all participants achieved the target rate (100% at 80 min(-1) vs. 70% at 160 min(-1)). Rates above 120 min(-1) had the greatest impact on reducing chest compression quality.

CONCLUSIONS

For Guidelines 2005 trained rescuers, a chest compression rate of 100-120 min(-1) for 2 min is feasible whilst maintaining adequate chest compression quality in terms of depth, duty-cycle, leaning, and decay in compression performance. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of the Guidelines 2010 recommendation for deeper and faster chest compressions.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is accessible to all HEFT staff and students via NHS Evidence www.evidence.nhs.uk by using their HEFT Athens login IDs
Subjects: WD Diseases and disorders of systemic, metabolic or environmental origin > WD400 Emergency medicine
Divisions: Emergency Services > Emergency Department
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Mrs Caroline Tranter
Date Deposited: 02 Dec 2014 11:13
Last Modified: 02 Dec 2014 11:13
URI: http://www.repository.heartofengland.nhs.uk/id/eprint/680

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