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Postoperative pulmonary complications following thoracic surgery: are there any modifiable risk factors?

Agostini, Paula and Cieslik, H and Rathinam, S and Bishay, Ehab and Kalkat, M S and Rajesh, P B and Steyn, R S and Singh, S and Naidu, Babu V (2010) Postoperative pulmonary complications following thoracic surgery: are there any modifiable risk factors? Thorax, 65 (9). pp. 815-8. ISSN 1468-3296. This article is accessible to all HEFT staff and students via NHS Evidence www.evidence.nhs.uk by using their HEFT Athens login Ids

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Official URL: http://thorax.bmj.com/content/65/9/815.long

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC) are the most frequently observed complications following lung resection, of which pneumonia and atelectasis are the most common. PPCs have a significant clinical and economic impact associated with increased observed number of deaths, morbidity, length of stay and associated cost. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and impact of PPCs and to identify potentially modifiable independent risk factors.

METHODS

A prospective observational study was carried out on all patients following lung resection via thoracotomy in a regional thoracic centre over 13 months. PPC was assessed using a scoring system based on chest x-ray, raised white cell count, fever, microbiology, purulent sputum and oxygen saturations.

RESULTS

Thirty-four of 234 subjects (14.5%) had clinical evidence of PPC. The PPC patient group had a significantly longer length of stay (LOS) in hospital, high dependency unit (HDU) LOS, higher frequency of intensive care unit (ITU) admission and a higher number of hospital deaths. Older patients, body mass index (BMI) > or =30 kg/m(2), preoperative activity <400 m, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score > or =3, smoking history, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lower preoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) and predicted postoperative (PPO) FEV(1) were all significantly (p<0.05) associated with PPC on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that age >75 years, BMI > or =30 kg/m(2), ASA > or =3, smoking history and COPD were significant independent risk factors in the development of PPC (p<0.05).

CONCLUSION

The clinical impact of PPCs is marked. Significant independent preoperative risk factors have been identified in current clinical practice. Potentially modifiable risk factors include BMI, smoking status and COPD. The impact of targeted therapy requires further evaluation.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is accessible to all HEFT staff and students via NHS Evidence www.evidence.nhs.uk by using their HEFT Athens login Ids
Subjects: WF Respiratory system. Respiratory medicine
WG Cardiovascular system. Cardiology
Divisions: Planned IP Care > Thoracic Surgery
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Mr Philip O'Reilly
Date Deposited: 27 Jun 2014 13:49
Last Modified: 27 Jun 2014 13:49
URI: http://www.repository.heartofengland.nhs.uk/id/eprint/390

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