Attitudes to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Defibrillator Use: A Survey of UK Adults in 2017.

Hawkes, Claire A and Brown, Terry P and Booth, Scott and Fothergill, Rachael T and Siriwardena, Niroshan and Zakaria, Sana and Askew, Sara and Williams, Julia and Rees, Nigel and Ji, Chen and Perkins, Gavin D (2019) Attitudes to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Defibrillator Use: A Survey of UK Adults in 2017. Journal of the American Heart Association, 8 (7). e008267. ISSN 2047-9980. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Official URL: http://tinyurl.com/y3qwp9uk

Abstract

Background Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation ( CPR ) and public access defibrillator ( PAD ) use can save the lives of people who experience out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Little is known about the proportions of UK adults trained, their characteristics and willingness to act if witnessing an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, or the public's knowledge regarding where the nearest PAD is located. Methods and Results An online survey was administered by YouGov to a nonprobabilistic purposive sample of UK adults, achieving 2084 participants, from a panel that was matched to be representative of the population. We used descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression modeling for analysis. Almost 52% were women, 61% were aged <55 years, and 19% had witnessed an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Proportions ever trained were 57% in chest-compression-only CPR, 59% in CPR , and 19.4% in PAD use. Most with training in any resuscitation technique had trained at work (54.7%). Compared with people not trained, those trained in PAD use said they were more likely to use one (odds ratio: 2.61), and those trained in CPR or chest-compression-only CPR were more likely to perform it (odds ratio: 5.39). Characteristics associated with being trained in any resuscitation technique included youth, female sex, higher social grade, and full-time employment. Conclusions In the United Kingdom, training makes a difference in people's willingness to act in the event of a cardiac arrest. Although there is considerable opportunity to increase the proportion of the general population trained in CPR , consideration should be also given to encouraging training in PAD use and targeting training for those who are older or from lower social grades.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: WG Cardiovascular system. Cardiology
Divisions: Clinical Support > Critical Care
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Depositing User: Mrs Caroline Tranter
Date Deposited: 29 Mar 2019 16:08
Last Modified: 29 Mar 2019 16:08
URI: http://www.repository.heartofengland.nhs.uk/id/eprint/1982

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