Split versus living-related adult liver transplantation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Gavriilidis, Paschalis and Azoulay, Daniel and Sutcliffe, Robert P and Roberts, Keith J (2019) Split versus living-related adult liver transplantation: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Langenbeck's archives of surgery. ISSN 1435-2451. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Official URL: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00423...

Abstract

BACKGROUND-OBJECTIVE

The outcomes of split liver transplantation between recipients of deceased donor split liver transplant (SLT) or live donor liver transplants (LDLT) have never been compared in meta-analysis. It is important to understand graft and recipient survival between recipients of these grafts.

METHODS

Databases were searched for relevant articles over the previous 20 years (MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar). Meta-analyses were performed using both fixed- and random-effects models. Patient survival and graft survival were obtained using the inverse variance hazard ratio method.

RESULTS

There were differences in the characteristics of the donors and recipients. Donors of the SLT were younger compared to LDLT cohort [mean difference (MD) = - 11.12 years (- 15.41 to - 6.84), p < 0.001] whilst recipients of LDLT were younger [MD = - 2.06 years (- 1.12 to - 3.01), p < 0.001]. Significantly fewer men received grafts after SLT, 45%, compared to those receiving LDLT, 55%, [OR = 0.66 (0.55 to 0.80), p < 0.001]. There were no significant differences detected in postoperative complications, graft and patient 1-, 3- and 5-year survival between the SLT and LDLT cohorts.

CONCLUSIONS

There is no apparent difference in overall survival, graft survival or complications between recipients of SLT or LDLT. However, characteristics of the donor and recipients differed suggesting the need for adequate risk-adjusted assessment of outcomes.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: WJ Urogenital system. Urology
Divisions: Emergency Services > Renal
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Depositing User: Mr Philip O'Reilly
Date Deposited: 19 Mar 2019 15:51
Last Modified: 19 Mar 2019 15:51
URI: http://www.repository.heartofengland.nhs.uk/id/eprint/1949

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