A survey of practice of rapid sequence induction for caesarean section in England.

Desai, N and Wicker, J and Sajayan, A and Mendonca, C (2018) A survey of practice of rapid sequence induction for caesarean section in England. International journal of obstetric anesthesia, 36. pp. 3-10. ISSN 1532-3374. This article is available to all HEFT staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their HEFT Athens login IDs

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

In view of newer techniques of preoxygenation and laryngoscopy and recent obstetric guidelines concerning the management of difficult intubation, we aimed to evaluate the current practice of rapid sequence induction for caesarean section in England.

METHODS

In 2017, 316 questionnaire surveys were posted to all 158 hospitals with caesarean section capabilities in England. At each hospital, one questionnaire was to be completed by the obstetric anaesthetic consultant lead and one by an anaesthetic trainee. Differences in responses between consultants and trainees, regardless of their place of work, were compared for all data using the chi-square and the Fisher's exact tests.

RESULTS

One-hundred-and-eighty complete questionnaires were returned, with an overall response rate of 57%, 98 (54%) from obstetric anaesthetic consultant leads and 82 (45.6%) from trainees). Both head up (57%) and ramped (56%) were the preferred positions for preoxygenation. Less than half of respondents (43%) preoxygenated until the surgeon was scrubbed. Cricoid pressure was used by almost all respondents (98%). Thiopentone (67%) was the most commonly chosen anaesthetic induction agent and most respondents (82%) supported a change to the use of propofol. Suxamethonium (92%) was the neuromuscular blocker of choice but more than half the respondents (52%) supported a change to rocuronium. In the event of a failed intubation, the rescue supraglottic airway device of choice was the i-gel® (65%).

CONCLUSIONS

Our survey demonstrated the significant variation in the practice of rapid sequence induction for caesarean section in obstetrics in the United Kingdom.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all HEFT staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their HEFT Athens login IDs
Subjects: WO Surgery > WO500 Anaesthesia
WQ Obstetrics. Midwifery
Divisions: Clinical Support > Anaesthetics
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Mrs Yolande Brookes
Date Deposited: 09 Nov 2018 14:54
Last Modified: 09 Nov 2018 14:54
URI: http://www.repository.heartofengland.nhs.uk/id/eprint/1775

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