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Developments in the management of patients with lung cancer in the United kingdom have improved quality of care.

Naidu, Babu V and Rajesh, Pala B (2008) Developments in the management of patients with lung cancer in the United kingdom have improved quality of care. Proceedings of the American Thoracic Society, 5 (8). pp. 816-9. ISSN 1546-3222. This article is accessible to all HEFT staff and students via NHS Evidence www.evidence.nhs.uk by using their HEFT Athens login IDs

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Abstract

The management of patients with lung cancer has undergone significant improvement in the last decade in the United Kingdom. The 5-year survival for all patients diagnosed with lung cancer had remained unchanged at 5% over the previous decade, well behind Europe and the United States. Together, government and medical bodies produced guidelines based on best available evidence. The dissemination of these guidelines into clinical practice became the remit of Cancer Networks. The establishment of Multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) has streamlined care and allowed individual teams to discuss patients' management within a wider body of expertise. The Cancer Network quality assurance team assesses the MDTs to ensure that standards are maintained. Though the efficacy of the MDTs in improving quality and consistency of care for patients with lung cancer is irrefutable, the effects on overall survival rates are less certain. The majority of patients have advanced incurable disease at presentation. Changes in awareness of the general public and in the primary care setting are required to address this issue. Severe co-morbidities in patients with potentially curable disease can also preclude operative treatment. The delivery of specialized care for patients with lung cancer has improved dramatically in the United Kingdom with the advent of national guidelines and the local MDT. These measures may not be enough in remedying the poor long-term survival of patients with lung cancer in the United Kingdom without attention to underlying cause. A holistic attitude to the "Big Three" smoking-induced diseases offers hope of novel approach to this problem.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is accessible to all HEFT staff and students via NHS Evidence www.evidence.nhs.uk by using their HEFT Athens login IDs
Subjects: QZ Pathology. Oncology
WF Respiratory system. Respiratory medicine
Divisions: Planned IP Care > Oncology and Clinical Haematology
Planned IP Care > Respiratory Medicine
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Sophie Rollason
Date Deposited: 10 Jun 2014 13:24
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2014 13:24
URI: http://www.repository.heartofengland.nhs.uk/id/eprint/164

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