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A cross-sectional study on teaching pelvic examination in medical schools in the UK (the COTES study).

Janjua, Aisha and Smith, Paul and Clark, T Justin (2018) A cross-sectional study on teaching pelvic examination in medical schools in the UK (the COTES study). Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology : the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. pp. 1-5. ISSN 1364-6893. This article is available to all HEFT staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their HEFT Athens login IDs

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Official URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0144361...

Abstract

Gynaecological teaching associates (GTAs) appear to be effective in aiding medical students to acquire core skills in female pelvic examination (FPE). The aim was to explore the current provision for teaching and assessment of FPE in Obstetric and Gynaecological (O&G) placements across UK medical schools and in particular, the use of GTAs. An online survey was sent to undergraduate academic leads for O&G, representing 29 of the 30 UK medical schools. The response rate was 21/29 (72%). The average placement was 6.7 weeks and teaching of FPE varied including training on manikins (20/21, 95%), instruction in outpatient clinics (17/21, 81%) and instruction on anaesthetised patients (17/21, 81%). The survey revealed that anatomic pelvic models are combined with supervised instruction in outpatient clinics and operating theatres. GTAs are used by less than a third of medical schools, and where used are thought to enhance teaching in this core skill in contrast to those universities not using GTAs. Short placements, a reluctance to use GTAs and a lack of formal assessment may adversely impact upon the competency of newly qualifying medical students in FPE. Impact statement What is already known on this subject: Experience of female pelvic examination intimate is limited. Expert patients, known as Gynaecological Teaching Associates (GTAs), have been suggested as a potential solution to improve teaching of gynaecological examination, but the last survey of medical schools in the United Kingdom (UK) conducted in 1989 reported that only two were using GTAs in an average clinical placement length of 11.5 weeks. What the results of this study add: Twenty-five years after the last survey, Obstetrics and Gynaecology (O&G) clinical placements have been reduced to an average of 6 weeks with one-third requiring only an informal impression of competence in female pelvic examination. Despite published evidence since 1989 supporting the effectiveness of GTAs, just six medical schools are using GTAs for teaching and assessment with all believing them to be effective. What the implications are of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research: A combination of short placements, an apparent reluctance to use GTAs and a lack of uniform formal assessment may mean that the competency of newly qualifying medical students in basic gynaecological examination is compromised.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all HEFT staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their HEFT Athens login IDs
Subjects: WP Gynaecology. Women’s health
Divisions: Womens and Childrens > Gynaecology
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Mrs Caroline Tranter
Date Deposited: 13 Feb 2018 14:51
Last Modified: 13 Feb 2018 14:51
URI: http://www.repository.heartofengland.nhs.uk/id/eprint/1598

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