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Informing future research for carriage of multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria: problems with recruiting to an English stool sample community prevalence study.

Lecky, Donna M and Nakiboneka-Ssenabulya, Deborah and Nichols, Tom and Hawkey, Peter M and Turner, Kim and Chung, Keun-Taik and Thomas, Mike and Thomas, Helen Lucy and Xu McCrae, Li and Shabir, Sahida and Manzoor, Susan and Alvarez-Buylla, Adela and Smith, Steve and McNulty, Cliodna (2017) Informing future research for carriage of multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria: problems with recruiting to an English stool sample community prevalence study. BMJ open, 7 (12). e017947. ISSN 2044-6055. This article is available to all HEFT staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their HEFT Athens login IDs

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Official URL: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/12/e017947.long

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This study aims to highlight problems with recruiting to an English stool sample community prevalence study. It was part of a larger cross-sectional research to determine the risk factors for the presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and carbapenemase-producing coliforms in stool samples of the asymptomatic general English population.

SETTING

Four National Health Service primary care trusts (PCTs) of England representing a different section of the population of England: Newham PCT; Heart of Birmingham Teaching PCT; Shropshire County PCT; and Southampton City PCT.

PARTICIPANTS

Sixteen general practices across the four PCTs were purposefully selected. After stratification of GP lists by age, ethnicity and antibiotic use, 58 337 randomly selected patients were sent a postal invitation.Patients who had died, moved to a different surgery, were deemed too ill by their General Practitioner or hospitalised at the time of mailing were excluded.

RESULTS

Stool and questionnaire returns varied by area, age, gender and ethnicity; the highest return rate of 27.3% was in Shropshire in the age group of over 60 years; the lowest, 0.6%, was in Birmingham in the age group of 18-39 years. Whereas only 3.9%(2296) returned a completed questionnaire and stool sample, 94.9% of participants gave permission for their sample and data to be used in future research.

CONCLUSION

Researchers should consider the low stool specimen return rate and wide variation by ethnicity and age when planning future studies involving stool specimen collection. This is particularly pertinent if the study has no health benefit to participants. Further research is needed to explore how to improve recruitment in multicultural communities and in younger people.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all HEFT staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their HEFT Athens login IDs
Subjects: QW Microbiology. Immunology
Divisions: Clinical Support
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Miss Emily Johnson
Date Deposited: 26 Jan 2018 13:41
Last Modified: 26 Jan 2018 13:41
URI: http://www.repository.heartofengland.nhs.uk/id/eprint/1560

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