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Prescription rates of adrenaline auto-injectors for children in UK general practice: a retrospective cohort study.

Diwakar, Lavanya and Cummins, Carole and Ryan, Ronan and Marshall, Tom and Roberts, Tracy (2017) Prescription rates of adrenaline auto-injectors for children in UK general practice: a retrospective cohort study. The British journal of general practice : the journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners, 67 (657). e300-e305. ISSN 1478-5242. This article is available to all HEFT staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their HEFT Athens login IDs

Full text not available from this repository.
Official URL: http://bjgp.org/content/67/657

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Adrenaline auto-injectors (AAI) should be provided to individuals considered to be at high risk of anaphylaxis. There is some evidence that the rate of AAI prescription is increasing, but the true extent has not been previously quantified.

AIM

To estimate the trends in annual GP-issued prescriptions for AAI among UK children between 2000 and 2012.

DESIGN AND SETTING

Retrospective cohort study using data from primary care practices that contributed to The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database.

METHOD

Children and young people aged between 0-17 years of age with a prescription for AAIs were identified, and annual AAI device prescription rates were estimated using Stata (version 12).

RESULTS

A total of 1.06 million UK children were identified, providing 5.1 million person years of follow-up data. Overall, 23 837 children were deemed high risk by their GPs, and were prescribed 98 737 AAI devices. This equates to 4.67 children (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.66 to 4.69), and 19.4 (95% CI = 19.2 to 19.5) devices per 1000 person years. Between 2000 and 2012, there has been a 355% increase in the number of children prescribed devices, and a 506% increase in the total number of AAI devices prescribed per 1000 person years in the UK. The number of devices issued per high-risk child during this period has also increased by 33%.

CONCLUSION

The number of children being prescribed AAI devices and the number of devices being prescribed in UK primary care between 2000 and 2012 has significantly increased. A discussion to promote rational prescribing of AAIs in the NHS is needed.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all HEFT staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their HEFT Athens login IDs
Subjects: W Public health. Health statistics. Occupational health. Health education
WD Diseases and disorders of systemic, metabolic or environmental origin > WD300 Hypersensitivity. Allergy
Divisions: Clinical Support
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Mrs Yolande Brookes
Date Deposited: 22 Jun 2017 10:53
Last Modified: 22 Jun 2017 10:56
URI: http://www.repository.heartofengland.nhs.uk/id/eprint/1417

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