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The Operative Burden of General Surgical Disease and Non-Battle Injury in a Deployed Military Treatment Facility in Afghanistan.

Hollingsworth, Andrew C and Bowley, Douglas M and Lundy, Jonathan B (2016) The Operative Burden of General Surgical Disease and Non-Battle Injury in a Deployed Military Treatment Facility in Afghanistan. Military medicine, 181 (9). pp. 1065-8. ISSN 1930-613X. This article is available to all HEFT staff and students via ASK HEFT Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c using their HEFT Athens Login.

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Official URL: http://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/pmarticle/15...

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Contemporary medical operations support a mobile, nonconventional force involved in nation building, counterinsurgency, and humanitarian operations. Prior reports have described surgical care for disease and nonbattle injuries (DNBI). The purpose of this report is to describe the prevalence and scope of DNBI managed by general surgeons in a contemporary, deployed medical facility.

METHODS

A 2-year retrospective review of the operative logbook from the U.K. Role 3 Multinational Hospital, Camp Bastion, Afghanistan, was performed to determine the prevalence and makeup of procedures performed for DNBI by general surgeons.

RESULTS

Nontrauma general surgical procedures accounted for 7.7% (n = 279 of 3,607 cases) of cases; appendectomy (n = 146) was the most common, followed by drainage of soft tissue (n = 55) and oral abscesses (n = 5), scrotal exploration (n = 12), and hernia repair (n = 7). A total of 7.2% (n = 20 of 279) of cases fell outside the standard scope of practice of an urban, civilian general surgeon.

CONCLUSION

Although the prevalence of operative procedures for DNBI was low, the spectrum of cases included those not typically managed in the civilian setting of the United Kingdom. With an evolving decline in case volume performed in multiple anatomic locations due to subspecialization during surgical training, this gap in expertise is likely to increase.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all HEFT staff and students via ASK HEFT Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c using their HEFT Athens Login.
Subjects: WB Practice of medicine
Divisions: Planned IP Care > General Surgery
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Mr Philip O'Reilly
Date Deposited: 03 Apr 2017 15:37
Last Modified: 03 Apr 2017 15:37
URI: http://www.repository.heartofengland.nhs.uk/id/eprint/1370

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