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Superfertility is more prevalent in obese women with recurrent early pregnancy miscarriage.

Bhandari, H M and Tan, B K and Quenby, S (2016) Superfertility is more prevalent in obese women with recurrent early pregnancy miscarriage. BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology, 123 (2). pp. 217-22. ISSN 1471-0528.

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Official URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1471-05...

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the effects of obesity on superfertility.

DESIGN

Retrospective observational study.

SETTING

A tertiary referral implantation clinic.

POPULATION

Four hundred and fourteen women attending a tertiary implantation clinic with a history of recurrent miscarriage (RMC), over a 4-year period.

METHODS

Pattern of pregnancy loss and time to pregnancy intervals for each pregnancy were collected by medical staff from women with RMC. The women were categorised into normal, overweight and obese according to their body mass index (BMI). Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed estimating the cumulative probability of a spontaneous pregnancy over time. The pregnancy loss patterns were correlated with BMI and data were compared between the categories using the Kruskal-Wallis test.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Pregnancy loss pattern and time to pregnancy intervals.

RESULTS

Overall, 23.2, 51.4 and 64.2% of women conceived within first 1, 3 and 6 months, respectively. Obese women had cumulative pregnancy rates of 65.2 and 80% by three and 6 months, respectively, which was more than the cumulative pregnancy rates for women with normal BMI (49.2 and 65.8%). Comparison of survival curves indicated a significant difference in time to conceive for obese when compared with normal and overweight women (*P = 0.01), suggesting a higher prevalence of superfertility in obese women with RMC.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings suggest that obese women may have a greater efficacy to achieve pregnancy, but with an increased risk of miscarriage, which may suggest the possible metabolic effects of obesity on endometrium.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WP Gynaecology. Women’s health
Divisions: Womens and Childrens > Gynaecology
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Preeti Puligari
Date Deposited: 29 Mar 2017 15:09
Last Modified: 29 Mar 2017 15:09
URI: http://www.repository.heartofengland.nhs.uk/id/eprint/1293

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